Pedestrian accidents, when they are not fatal, can leave victims dealing with serious, sometimes catastrophic, injuries. Perhaps this happened to you somewhere in Tampa, Florida. You may be eligible for compensation, but filing a claim can be a complex process.

First of all, it may be good to know just how widespread, and how deadly, pedestrian accidents are. The number of pedestrian fatalities in the U.S. has been going up steadily since 2009. Looking at the latest data, which encompasses the first half of 2019, the Governors Highway Safety Administration found that nothing changed that year.

An estimated 6,590 pedestrian deaths

The GHSA estimated that 6,590 pedestrians died in 2019. Assuming the accuracy of the number, it marks a 5% increase from 2018 and a 60% jump from 2009 with its total of 4,109 pedestrian fatalities. The number has not been this high since 1988.

Florida, along with New Mexico and Hawaii, saw the highest rate of pedestrian deaths per 100,000 people whereas the lowest rates were in Vermont, Wisconsin and Idaho. Florida, Georgia, Texas, Arizona and California together accounted for 47% of all the fatalities. Roughly one-third of the U.S. population is found in these five states.

Other traffic deaths saw no similar increase

All other traffic deaths rose 2% between 2009 and 2018, according to the GHSA report. As for why pedestrian deaths have climbed so high, there are several explanations. More drivers are letting themselves be distracted by their phones, for example.

One significant factor is the greater number of light trucks, including SUVs, on the road. These vehicles were involved in 48% of new vehicle sales in 2009 but 69% in 2019. The GHSA states that large SUVs are twice as likely to kill pedestrians in a collision as an ordinary car is.

A lawyer who pays attention to details

You survived your ordeal, but you’re still struggling to recover both physically and emotionally. You may want a lawyer who deals in pedestrian collisions to take on your case. With a lawyer, you might achieve a fair settlement with the guilty driver’s insurer.